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Sessions & Schedule

Plenary Speakers

Lynn Silver_edited.jpg

Lynn Silver

Senior Advisor, Public Health Institute

Lauren Choolijan

Senior Reporter/Producer, NH Public Radio

Annmarie Timmins

Senior Reporter, New Hampshire Bulletin

Monday, December 4th, 2023

Registration

8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Assembly

Breakfast

8:00 - 9:00 AM

Armory

Plenary: Cannabis in NH: Public Health Implications and Considerations for Responsible Commercialization
9:00 - 10:00 AM

Four Rivers Ballroom

This presentation will review the national landscape of cannabis policy to offer lessons learned from other states.  Often, issues of economics and public safety can dominate the policy considerations, leaving important public health concerns on the sidelines. As New Hampshire prepares for a major policy debate on responsible cannabis legalization, this presentation will offer guidance, identify critical factors and regulations necessary to create a responsible model for retail sale, and establish a foundational understanding of key health and prevention issues which must be part of the upcoming policy debate.

Lynn Silver, Senior Advisor, Public Health Institute in Oakland, CA

Slide deck here

Break with Exhibitors

10:00 - 10:30 AM

Assembly

Block A Workshops

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

A1 – Building Futures Together: Strengthening the Paraprofessional and Peer Behavioral Health Workforce

Contoocook

This presentation will focus on a training program offered through the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire called Building Futures Together for paraprofessionals and peers working in the behavioral health field. This program has been designed to support each learner, build their skills and knowledge, and help them grow in the field. Building Futures Together creates a workforce pipeline for trainees to pursue opportunities for growth through individualized development, training, and access to resources, which has improved our capacity to serve individuals who experience problematic use of substances and mental health challenges in NH.

 

Macey Muller, Project Director II, IOD/University of New Hampshire

JoAnne Malloy, Research Associate Professor, Institute on Disability/UCED and Social Work, University of New Hampshire

Michelle Lennon, Executive Director, Archways

Slide deck here

 

A2 – The Intersection of “Fun” and “Therapy”

Merrimack

 

New Hampshire definition He-M 426.02: "Functional Support Services (FSS)" means medically necessary individual and group interventions that support optimal functioning and enhance resiliency, recovery, and integration in the community. FSS are at the intersection of home, school, office, and community-based opportunities to provide opportunities to develop, reinforce, apply, and integrate skills in a fun, engaging, and clinically indicated manner. This interactive workshop’s goals are to provide a history and define the types of FSS in community mental health and New Hampshire; connect FSS as a prescribed service to the diagnosis, level of functioning, and treatment plan goals; provide example sessions with evidence-based protocols and intervention examples that align with therapeutic objectives; and examine possible challenges with the services and best practices to manage them, the outcomes of the services, and the future of FSS. This workshop will be interactive, where all providers will have an opportunity to gain insight into the critical role this service plays with children and adolescents.
 

Lindsay C. B. Murphy, Associate Director of Child, Adolescent, & Family Services, Greater Nashua Mental Health Center

Erika Krusen, Functional Support Services & Case Management Coordinator, Therapist, Greater Nashua Mental Health Center

Barbara Merrill, Director of Child, Adolescent, & Family Services, Greater Nashua Mental Health Center

Slide deck here

 

A3 – Empowering Young Voices to Prevent Suicide

Piscataquog

 

This workshop provides data about youth and young adult mental health, including the NH YRBS data that focuses on concerning behaviors that may lead to poor mental health and suicide. Participants will learn about the Connect Youth Leader, Connect Real Talk and Young Adult programs for students and how students gain skills and are empowered to be leaders in suicide prevention in their schools. Given that young people are more inclined to hear and learn from their peers, the Connect program trains youth to partner with adults to bring evidence-based information and life saving strategies about mental health, substance misuse and suicide risk to young audiences. It allows peers to become leaders in suicide prevention as they train peers, caregivers, faculty and staff in their schools. The Connect program opens a safe dialogue about mental health, substance misuse and suicide prevention to reduce risk and promote resources as well as strengthen the safety net for our youth and young adults. You will hear from a young person that shares her story about the role the Connect Program has played in her academic and personal development.

 

Susan Ward, Garrett Lee Smith Grant Program Coordinator, National Alliance on Mental Illness New Hampshire 

Laurie Belanger, Student Conduct Coordinator, NH Technical Institute

Marena Beale, Student

Slide deck here

 

A4 – Providing Clarity – Alcohol & Other Drug Use Professionals Credentialing in New Hampshire

Frost/Hawthorne

  

This workshop updates professionals on changes made to RSA 330-C (as of October 3, 2023 through SB 44), and adoption of revised Alc 300 administrative rules (as of March 13 2023 by the NH Board of Licensing for Alcohol and Other Drug Use Professionals). Presented by the Credentialing Support Partnership at NHADACA, this workshop provides the most recent and up-to-date information needed by NH's substance use providers, particularly those navigating NH substance use licensure and certification. The presentation gives an overview of the requirements of becoming a licensed substance use provider in NH. With a better understanding of the credentialing process, it is the goal of this program that more individuals will pursue credentialing thereby increasing NH's substance use workforce, increasing accessibility for treatment with a licensed/certified professional, and reducing barriers and wait times for those seeking services. The Credentialing Support Partnership at NHADACA supports providers navigating NH substance use licensure and certification. As such, the program provides support to individuals interested in becoming Certified Prevention Specialists, Certified Recovery Support Workers, Licensed Clinical Supervisors, Licensed Alcohol & Drug Counselors and Master Licensed Alcohol & Drug Counselors. The Credentialing Support Partnership provides guidance in navigating credentialing requirements for initial and renewal of credentials including access to support in completing the application and application requirements, LADC/MLADC supervision, training scholarships for enrolled participants, and exam preparation support.

 

Heather Smith, Clinical Supervisor, Credentialing Support Partnership, New Hampshire Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors Association

Nick Pfeifer, Clinical Supervisor, Credentialing Support Partnership, New Hampshire Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors Association

Slide deck here

 

A5 - Motivational Interviewing: A Model for Leadership Success

Pemigewasset

 

Retention of staff has been challenging nationwide, so it's imperative we learn all we can about effectively managing a team and supporting staff.  Management is one of the number one reasons people stay or leave a job. Applying Motivational Interviewing (MI) as it relates to workforce development and organizational management, this workshop is designed to assist professionals in leadership roles use MI when leading a team. We will review the basic philosophy, evidence, and spirit of MI; dive into the benefits of MI as a supervisory practice and discuss how it relates to cultivating staff development and productivity, improving supervisor-staff relationships and reducing burnout. The workshop has an interactive format facilitated by a MINT trainer.

 

Christine M. Powers, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and Master Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor

Slide deck here

A6 - Connecting Mental Health, Climate Justice, and Nature Through the Project ECHO Model

Dartmouth

This session will describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of an environmental health ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) program designed to educate transdisciplinary professionals about the connections between climate justice, mental health, and nature. Project ECHO is an innovative hub and spoke program that creates knowledge networks by bringing together transdisciplinary healthcare professionals. It utilizes a tele-mentoring approach involving brief lectures and case-based presentations. This brief Project ECHO series explored mental health concerns at the individual patient and practice level in primary care, mental health care and community settings and the intersection of climate justice, mental health, and nature in community contexts. The ECHO consisted of four modules in the fall of 2022 and attracted NH, regional, national, and international participation. Indigenous perspectives were integrated into all modules. We will also have an interactive discussion on how climate issues like the recent floods and wildfires could be impacting the mental health of NH residents and how to address it.
 
Semra Aytur, Professor, University of New Hampshire    
Corina Chao, Project Director, University of New Hampshire    

Slide deck here

Lunch & Networking

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Armory

Block B Workshops

1:00 - 2:30 PM

 

B1 – Engaging Communities in the Aftermath of Suicide: Critical Immediate and Long-Term Planning Steps for Community Postvention

Contoocook

 

Suicide can have a tremendous impact on individuals, families and friends, as well as on the broader community. A sudden traumatic loss requires strategies that are proactive, evidence based and coordinated across many sectors of the community. This workshop will look at evidence-based practices for an integrated and comprehensive community-based response to a suicide death in order reduce subsequent risk and promote healing. It will examine the effects of stigma, communication, media, memorials and safe messaging on risk of contagion. Using NAMI NH's Connect Postvention training and protocols, this workshop identifies the roles and relationships of key stakeholders in proactively planning an integrated response to traumatic death.

 

Elaine de Mello, Director of Suicide Prevention Services, National Alliance on Mental Illness New Hampshire 

Slide deck here

 

B2 – National & Local Reflections on the Integration of Tobacco Cessation in Behavioral Health Systems

Dartmouth

 

This panel presentation provides evidence and discussion to understanding of the changing substance use, mental health and primary health landscape. It promotes alignment of evidence-based services, integration and enhanced care coordination, and expansion of the workforce relative to health promotion, prevention, early identification, intervention, treatment and recovery supports. This presentation will describe efforts to integrate screening and treatment into behavioral health facilities, providing a national overview as well as local implementation perspectives from VT and NH.

 

Dana Bourne, Public Health Programs Administrator, Vermont Health Department, Division of Health Promotion & Disease Prevention

Teresa Brown, Program Specialist IV, State of NH Department of Health & Human Services, Bureau of Population and Wellness, Division of Public Health

Elias Klemperer, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Psychological Science, University of Vermont

Slide deck here

 

B3 – A Case Study on Factors Influencing Retention of Mental Health Clinicians in a New Hampshire CMHC

Merrimack

 

This presentation explores masters level mental health care providers and leadership perspectives, using single case study methodology, to examine clinician retention in Community Mental Health Centers (CMHC). This study sought to understand clinician and leadership perspectives as to why master-level providers choose to continue working at CMHCs. Most prior research on turnover in such organizations has focused on why so many leave their positions, however this study instead focuses on factors related to the decision to stay at a specific CMHC in an urban area of New Hampshire. The findings to be presented including what draws providers to Community Mental Health Centers, the importance of connections with colleagues and leadership and other aspects of shy masters-level providers stay. This study contributes to the understanding of clinician retention and provides recommendations for clinicians, CMHC leadership and clinical mental health educators.

 

William Keating, Owner & Therapist, Avanti Counseling & Consultation

Slide deck here

 

B4 – Promoting Access to Behavioral Health Care by Expanding Primary Care Capacity

Frost/Hawthorne

 

In this workshop, participants will explore the factors impacting access to behavioral health care for children and adolescents using health care claims and other data. This workshop will outline the need to broaden and generalize the workforce and settings that can support children and adolescents with mental health needs and their families. Several creative approaches to expanding primary care capacity to screen, assess, and treat mild to moderate mental health concerns will be highlighted including: trauma screening, child psychiatric access program (CPAP), Project ECHO, and the Collaborative Care Model (CoCM). Facilitators and barriers to expansion of these approaches will be explored. Participants will engage in a facilitated activity that gauges current understanding and perceptions of models like the CoCM and CPAP. The facilitators will use these answers to lead discussion of additional strategies and approaches to improve access using available resources.

 

Katie Lipp, Project Director, Delivery System & Payment Reform, Institute on Health Policy and Practice, University of New Hampshire

Corina Chao, Project Director I, Institute on Health Policy and Practice, University of New Hampshire

Delitha Watts, Project Director, Institute on Health Policy and Practice, University of New Hampshire

Slide deck here

 

B5 – Breakthrough? Psychedelic Psychotherapies, Interventional Psychiatry, and Other New and Prospective Treatments for Mental Health Challenges

Pemigewasset

 

We are experiencing an unprecedented time in the modern memory of mental health treatment. In recent decades, many of the treatments in the field of mental health have been refinements of existing treatments (new brands of psychotherapy, a “third wave” of CBT, the availability of SNRIs in addition to SSRIs), and new drugs that are roughly comparable to their existing counterparts...or, in some cases reconsiderations of older treatments such as MAOI drugs. There is presently great deal of excitement in the field as we are seeing the emergence of new and novel treatments, including some that have been given “breakthrough therapy designation” by the FDA in their approval processes. In some cases, these treatments even redefine how we think about what psychotherapy is, how psychotherapy and medications can work together. This workshop will explore new – and some still investigational – treatments, that are changing the landscape of services for complex psychiatric conditions including treatment resistant depression (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation), Spravato/esketamine, IV ketamine, psilocybin) and Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - MDMA assisted psychotherapy, and other research in process for new treatments.

 

Kurt L. White, Vice President, Community Partnerships/DEI Officer, Brattleboro Retreat

Slide deck here

 

B6 – Stigma: What Is It? And How Does Research Inform Its Impact on Individuals, Institutions, and Public Policy?

Piscataquog

 

We all use the term stigma, but do we have a clear understanding of what it is? Is there a difference between stigma and discrimination?  This workshop will provide research/evidence informed review the major types of stigmas associated with mental illness and substance use disorders including: self-stigma, public/societal stigma, professional stigma and institutional stigma.  We will look at the impact stigma has on individuals, family members, professionals, institutions, the greater society, public policy, and special populations including communities of color, veteran, and LGBTQ populations.  We will also discuss how media contributes to stigma, and research about the most effective strategies for combating stigma. 

 

Kenneth Norton, Former Executive Director, National Alliance on Mental Illness New Hampshire

Slide deck here

 

Break with Exhibitors

2:30 - 3:00 PM

Armory

Block C Workshops

3:00 - 4:30 PM 

C1 – We Are Here: Ensuring Behavioral Health Equity Access for All

Merrimack

 

Behavioral health providers have a responsibility to provide language and communication access for their clients, however many organizations struggle with limited resources, workforce shortages, and other challenges that create barriers to access. How can behavioral health providers ensure culturally responsive care in the face of complex systems, limited time and limited resources? This workshop will showcase a video that lifts & amplifies voices from NH residents who have experienced challenges accessing behavioral health services in NH & facilitate a discussion to explore steps to advance equity and improve supports utilizing the National Standards for Culturally & Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS).

 

Heidi Cloutier, Social Emotional Learning/PBIS Academy Trainer and Consultant, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Education Development Center

JoAnne Malloy, Principal Investigator, Children’s Behavioral Health Resource Center

Eva Castillo, Director, NH Alliance for Immigrants and Refugees/Welcoming NH

Slide deck here

 

C2 – New Threats, New Tactics: Emerging High-Risk Alcohol Products, What They Are and What You Can Do

Piscataquog

 

The alcohol industry knows its message: that alcohol is part of having fun, having friends, playing sports, or being sexy or manly. This presentation will focus on the influence of advertising and alcohol industry practices on underage drinking. Presenters will provide a thorough inspection of industry practices that get kids’ attention with a special emphasis on emerging, high-risk alcohol products.  High risk alcohol products are defined as products that are produced, marketed or advertised in a way that creates an unreasonable risk of being attractive to teens or kids that have been introduced to the market in the past 3 years. Presenters will describe and provide examples in 6 categories of high-risk products, such as products designed to be “healthy”, youthfully packaged, flavorings, and the creation of alcohol versions of beverages that are traditionally teen oriented (and non-alcoholic). The session will also examine the role of social media in promoting these products.   This workshop will provide a high-level overview of NH’s alcohol regulatory system and changes over the years that has led to community activism related to high-risk alcohol products including proposed policy changes being considered in the NH State Legislature. Participants will leave knowing the process and purpose of conducting environmental scans in their own communities to look for emerging, high-risk alcohol products. In being able to conduct these scans in their own communities, attendees will be able to challenge retailers and spread awareness about the effects the marketing and placement of these products have on underage drinking.

 

Vicki Harris, Coalition Coordinator, Dover Coalition for Youth

Izabelle Wensley, Contracted Project Coordinator, US Alcohol Policy Alliance

Kate Frey, Vice President of Advocacy, New Futures, Inc.

Slide deck here

 

C3 – Family Threads: A Program Integrating Peer Recovery Support and Family Strengthening and Support

Frost/Hawthorne

 

This workshop will introduce participants to an innovative approach to peer-based recovery. The workshop will provide the theory supporting the development of the Family Threads program including its design and implementation.  Family Threads programming integrates the practices and values of family support/strengthening and peer recovery support within the Archways family resource center. The NH Center for Excellence on Addiction has deemed Family Threads a Promising Practice through the Service to Science Initiative.  Currently, Archways is working with the Omni Institute of Colorado to collect data and prepare an application to be considered as an evidence-based program.

 

Michelle Lennon, Founder and Executive Director, Archways

Karen Welford, Trainer, New Hampshire Children’s Trust

Slide deck here

 

C4 – NHCORR Certified Recovery Housing – What Can You Expect?

Dartmouth

 

Housing in NH is difficult to secure and often becomes the focus for people in recovery.  NHCORR certified recovery housing is structured housing designed on an evidence based social model.  Gaining a clear understanding of the social model, what it means for a recovery house to be certified and what a resident can expect are critical factors in aligning services and care coordination.  Increased awareness of recovery housing can improve communication between recovery service providers and house operators.  This workshop provides a detailed presentation of NHCORR certified recovery residences, who operates them, what is provided and what is expected of the resident. A clear understanding of NHCORR certified recovery residences will assist providers and referring agencies in making the best choice with their clients and promote overall well-being.

 

Kim Bock, Executive Director, NH Coalition of Recovery Residences

Slide deck here

 

C5 – Whose Reality is it Anyways? Working with Alternate Experiences

Pemigewasset

 

Aligned with the person-centered, strengths-based approaches that we know to be effective in the mental health landscape, this workshop seeks to enhance care available to clients living with psychosis or alternate experiences.  Relevant to direct practice, working with people that experience psychosis if often misunderstood, or approached in a way that results in people rejecting, rather than accepting treatment.  By learning more about the alternate experiences people have, including debunking the myths about psychosis, we are able to strengthen the therapeutic relationship in a way that helps clients to understand and better cope with their experiences.

 

Stacie Lucius, Chief of Clinical Services, WestBridge

Theo Baars, Clinical Support Counselor, WestBridge

Slide deck here

 

C6 – Care at the Crossroads: A Financial Stress Test of the NH Substance Use Disorder Delivery System

Policy Track sponsored by the NH Charitable Foundation

Contoocook

In the Fall of 2022, Third Horizon Strategies was engaged by the NH Charitable Foundation to analyze the financial health of the substance use disorder delivery system in New Hampshire. This session will provide an in-depth review of the approach, findings and recommendations gleaned from the analysis. Through presentation and group discussion, the session will offer stakeholders an opportunity to explore ways they, their organizations and communities can be part of action steps that can unlock public and other available funding capital to ensure robust, accessible and stable service delivery going forward.

 

Tym Rourke, Vice President of People and Senior Director, Third Horizons Strategies

Slide deck here

 

Tuesday, December 5th, 2023

Registration

8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Assembly

Breakfast

8:00 - 9:00 AM

Armory

Plenary: Navigating News Media and Behavioral Health

9:00 - 10:00 AM

​Four Rivers Ballroom

Join Lauren Chooljian, producer of The 13th Step Podcast and NH Public Radio, and Annemarie Timmins from the NH Bulletin in a compelling panel discussion on the intersection of news media and behavioral health. Led by Kate Sullivan with White Birch Communications, this session delves into their unique approaches to covering substance use disorder and mental health. Discover how these journalists skillfully navigate the delicate balance between reporting the "news" and addressing issues of stigma, ethical considerations, and the crucial task of enhancing public understanding of behavioral health issues.

 

Lauren Choolijan, Senior Reporter/Producer, NH Public Radio
Annmarie Timmins, Senior Reporter, New Hampshire Bulletin
Kate Sullivan, Vice President of Communications, White Birch Communications

Break with Exhibitors

10:00 - 10:30 AM

Armory

 

Block D Workshops

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

D1 – Understanding the Role of Mental Illness in Violence

Policy Track sponsored by the NH Charitable Foundation

Contoocook

 

This workshop will discuss the 2019 report from the National Council for Behavioral Health, “Mass Violence in America: Causes, Impacts and Solutions.” It will describe what is and is not known about the correlation between psychiatric illness, treatments and violence as well as help attendees to recognize how threat management can mitigate implicit bias in violence risk evaluation. Participants will be able to distinguish reasons why mental health intervention may or may not be possible for people at risk for violence and utilize strategies to mitigate risk of violence in people with mental illness.

 

Joseph J. Parks, MD, Medical Director, National Council for Mental Wellbeing

Slide deck here

 

D2 – Exploring the Certified Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) Model for New Hampshire

Policy Track sponsored by the NH Charitable Foundation

Pemigewasset

On March 15, 2023, the US Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration awarded a 1-year grant for the New Hampshire Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CBHC) Planning Year. This workshop will review the basics of the CCBHC model and components of the 1-year planning grant to explore the CCBHC model as it relates to New Hampshire's behavioral health system and planning.

 

Mary Brunette, Professor of Psychiatry, Community, & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine

Eve Allen, Administrator II, Bureau of Mental Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health

Kerri Swenson, Mental Health Systems Administrator, NH DHHS

Slide deck here

 

D3 – Development and Implementation of the New Hampshire Recovery Community Organization Standards of Excellence Model

Merrimack

 

Recovery and recovery support have become recognized as critical components of behavioral health practice and policy over the past three decades, but the relative newness of the field means there is not yet a unilaterally accepted definition for peer recovery support services, nor consensus on what constitutes best practice. This workshop will provide an overview of how New Hampshire is working to develop a robust and effective system of Recovery Community Organizations (RCOs) across the state, with a focus on recently developed State RCO Standards of Excellence. The workshop will describe how the standards were developed and how they are being monitored and implemented in RCOs across the state to ensure continuous quality improvement. The workshop will also discuss lessons learned and the value of having a statewide standardized model for performance evaluation and improvement.

Sara Powell, Recovery Program Specialist, NH DHHS

Laurie Barger Sutter, CEO, Growth Partners

Laina Reavis, Program Manager, CRSW, Harbor Homes

Slide deck here

 

D4 – The Intersection of Mental Health and Public Health

Dartmouth

 

In the past decade there has been increased recognition that mental health is part of overall health, yet mental health challenges are increasing in our communities. While there are many factors contributing to our current “mental health crisis,” one factor may be our limited focus on population mental health. Traditional approaches to mental health have focused on clinical interventions, which generally achieve risk reduction for individuals. While the increase in integrated behavioral health has included some public health dissemination strategies to reach more individuals, most mental health care funding and strategies remain focused on individuals and do not address all the factors that contribute to decreases in mental wellbeing. In this session, an integrative approach to mental health based on a population perspective will be explored. In addition to the tasks of an integrative approach, such as screening and education, the need for the approach to be trauma-informed and intentionally foster psychological safety will be examined.

 

Cynthia Whitaker, President & CEO, Greater Nashua Mental Health

Slide deck here

 

D5 – Brain Injury & Mental Health: A Survivor’s Perspective

Frost/Hawthorne

 

Through a discussion of common symptoms and side effects following an acquired brain injury, participants will be able to better meet clients’ mental health needs.  With a better understanding of the intersectionality of brain injury and mental health disorders, specifically from a survivor's perspective, providers and natural supports can better work with individuals with these disorders. Participants will hear a survivor's first-hand account of experiences within both the medical and mental health systems.  Upon the completion of this presentation, participants will have increased knowledge of how to assess for and/or encourage assessment of the mental health needs of those with brain injury.

 

Chelsea Zarcone, Collaborative Care Intern/ Fee for Service Counselor/ Clinical Brain Injury Specialist, Center for Life Management

Jacob LaBrack, Owner/Operator, From the Ground Up, LLC

Slide deck here

 

D6 – Family Treatment Court: The Intersection of Abuse and Neglect Cases and Parental Substance Use Disorder

Piscataquog

 

When a parent with a substance use disorder has a child removed from their home, they have twelve months to improve the conditions that lead to the removal. Twelve months is a short time for the behavior change required to live a life in recovery, even though it is a long time in the context of a child's development. Family Treatment Court is a multidisciplinary court process that a family with an abuse and neglect case participates in when a parent has a substance use disorder. The process uses a supportive, team approach to increase the family’s access to supports and services, accountability and recovery, and likelihood of reunification. The team, (which includes parties to the case, treatment providers, peer support, case management and others) works to increase early access to treatment to address the needs of the parents, children and relationships within the family. This workshop will educate attendees on how families affected by SUD go through the typical abuse/neglect process.  It also describes how the family treatment court's multidisciplinary approach can lead to better outcomes, and invites participants to examine how they can be supportive of these families in their own work.

 

Jacqui Baker, Family Treatment Court Coordinator, NH Judicial Branch, Newport, NH

Tonya Suarez, Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker, Addiction Treatment Programs, Psychiatry

Daniel Swegart, Judge, NH Judicial Branch – Circuit Court

Slide deck here

 

Lunch & Networking

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Armory

Block E Workshops

1:00 - 2:30 PM

E1 – Advocacy 101: Influencing Behavioral Health Policy in NH

Policy Track sponsored by the NH Charitable Foundation

Pemigewasset

When people with professional and lived experiences are involved in the policy-making process, the result is public policy that positively impacts behavioral health services.   Effective public policy needs YOUR voice as an essential part of creating needed change. If you want to get involved but aren't sure where to start, this workshop will provide an introduction to engaging in state policy and advocacy efforts. Learn how the NH legislature works and how you can influence proposed policies by sharing your expertise and stories with legislators. This workshop will provide practical advice and resources for participating in public hearings, contacting legislators, using media, and other advocacy strategies. Whether you've never advocated before or want a refresher, you will leave feeling empowered with the knowledge and tools to take action when the 2024 legislative session starts in January.

 

Jess Wojenski, Training Manager, New Futures

Jake Berry, Vice President of Policy, New Futures, Inc.

Slide deck here

 

 

E2 – The Role of Behavioral Health Providers in School-Based Tiered Prevention

Contoocook

 

In this session, participants will increase their understanding of the role and function of school and community-based behavioral health providers within a school tiered prevention framework, such NH's Multi-Tiered System of Supports for Behavioral Health and Wellness (MTSS-B). Participants will review key components of a successful collaboration between districts/schools and community-based behavioral health providers, including development of a memorandum of understanding, in order to best leverage resources and partnerships. Lastly, participants will explore the role of school- and community-based behavioral health providers in implementing MTSS-B best practices, including requests for assistance, facilitated referral pathways, provision of clinical services, and progress monitoring.

 

Megan Phillips, Lead Evaluator, Behavioral Health Improvement Institute, Keene State College

Katherine Leswing, Program Specialist IV, New Hampshire Department of Education

Molly White, Program Specialist IV, New Hampshire Department of Education

Slide deck here

 

E3 – Suicide Prevention and LGBTQIA+ Youth

Merrimack

 

LGBTQ+ Youth are at four times greater risk of suicide than their non-LGBTQ+ peers, but why? Through the lens of suicide prevention, this workshop will discuss the risk factors that bring into view what LGBTQ+ youth are experiencing.  By defining gender and sexual orientation, identity and expression, this workshop will examine the risk factors that are causing higher rates of substance misuse and suicide for the LGBTQ+ community.  The impact of these experiences on their mental health and substance misuse as well as the protective factors that increase supports and connections will be discussed.

 

Marissa Carlson, Executive Director, New Hampshire Teen Institute

Maura McGowan, Program Director, New Hampshire Teen Institute

Slide deck here

 

E4 – The Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team: Bridging Gaps in Child Advocacy

Piscataquog

 

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team (ACERT) is a multi-disciplinary, cross-system, collaborative approach to addressing the negative effects of childhood trauma. The ACERT model acts as a referral mechanism that connects families and their children to local trauma-informed mental, behavioral and health services and social supports. The ACERT model has been touted as a best-practice secondary health prevention program by former California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke-Harris and has been replicated in multiple other communities in New England.  In this workshop, you will learn about adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their impacts on early childhood brain development; how positive connections in children's lives can mitigate the negative impacts of ACEs; and the history of the ACERT model and current efforts to replicate ACERT in various communities.

 

Katie Burns, ACERT Manager, Amoskeag Health

Caitlyn Kearney-Finn, ACERT Program Specialist, Amoskeag Health

Stephanie Savard, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Amoskeag Health

Slide deck here

 

Workshop Block F

3:00 - 4:30 PM

F1 – Community Mental Health 101

Policy Track sponsored by the NH Charitable Foundation

Contoocook

 

For more than 40 years, the local, non-profit community mental health centers have provided care for thousands of NH individuals.  Today these organizations are the foundation of a critical, but sometimes not fully understood “system” of behavioral health care.  This workshop will address the role this foundational, community-based system plays by examining its history, the scope of community mental health centers work, and most importantly the structure of the overall mental health care delivery system in NH. The presentations will draw upon research developed by the Community Behavioral Health Association, it’s partners in the Medicaid and other payer systems as well as the broader health care community. Finally, the audience discussion within the workshop will look forward to how the system will thrive in the future and how public policy can be better shaped, elevate and strengthen New Hampshire’s Community based system of mental health care.

 

Cynthia Whitaker, President and CEO, Greater Nashua Mental Health

Maggie Pritchard, Chief Executive Officer, Lakes Region Mental Health Center

Slide deck here

 

F2 – Improving Care Utilization, Fitness and Smoking in Young Adults with SMI: New Results from the ProHealth Integrated Care Program

Dartmouth

 

This workshop describes interventions to address disparate health outcomes among young adults with Serious Mental Illness (SMI).  SMI frequently begins in adolescence or young adulthood and even during young adulthood, people with SMI already have high rates of cardiovascular risk factors and medical comorbidities contributing to a greater burden of chronic disease and reduced life expectancy of approximately 10 years compared with the general population.  This panel presentation will describe integrated primary and community mental health care with health behavior change interventions designed for young adults with SMI.  It will discuss outcomes including reduction in emergency department and inpatient utilization for physical health needs, improvements in fitness and nutrition, and smoking cessation.  Each of three speakers will offer a 20-minute presentation followed by questions and interactive conversation with the audience to help participants determine how such programs may be implemented or improved in their service settings.

 

Mary Brunette, Professor of Psychiatry, Community & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine

Sarah Pratt, Associate Professor of Psychology, The Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine

Gillian Sowden, Program Director, Adult Psychiatry Residency Program, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center

Slide deck here

 

F3 – Integration of a Substance Use Disorder Clinical Pathway Across the Continuum: The Exeter Story

Merrimack

 

Exeter Health Resources used grant funding to partner with a third-party NH-based organization for a comprehensive evaluation of inpatient, outpatient, and emergency services as it relates to the care of patients with substance use disorder.  The Exeter team used the results of this assessment to formulate and implement a plan for continuous improvement and strategic alignment to better address the needs of patients.  This workshop shares these findings and lessons learned.

 

Sarah McGuire, Director of Population Health Operations, Exeter Health Resources/Exeter Hospital/ Core Physicians

Robert Kelly, Medical Director of Quality Improvement and Innovation, Population Health, Core Physicians

Sarah Slocum, Consultive Psychiatrist/ Psychiatry Service Line Physician Lead, Core Physicians/Exeter Hospital

Slide deck here

 

F4 – Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion within NH Drug Treatment Courts: Exploring the Impact on Recidivism and Considerations for Moving Forward

Piscataquog

 

This workshop will have three presenters sharing different perspectives on drug treatment courts in NH.  Alex Casale, NH Drug Court Coordinator, will describe the history and significance of NH's drug court program.  he will also provide an overview of the NH Treatment Drug Court Assessment, Training and Technical Assistance Program (DCATT) program. Rachel Kohn, DCATT Project Director, will provide data from the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion study conducted by the program and highlight demographic profiles of successful drug court participants. Data exploring potential predictive factors of 1-year recidivism rates among drug court participants will also be examined. Alison Welch, Cheshire County Drug Court Coordinator, will reflect on the data presented and share insights from her 10 years of direct experience working in treatment courts.

 

Alex Casale, Drug Offender Program Coordinator, New Hampshire Judicial Branch

Rachel Kohn, Senior Consultant, John Snow Research and Training Institute

Slide deck here

 

F5 – Academic Practice Partnerships: Building the Behavioral Health Workforce Pipeline

Pemigewasset

 

Designed specifically for the NH Behavioral Health Summit, this workshop offers a solution for building New Hampshire's behavioral health workforce.  Providing an innovative academic and practice partnership, the University of New Hampshire and the Mental Health Center of Greater Manchester will align resources for the development of an academic practice partnership model to create a sustainable and skilled mental health workforce for the State of NH. Within this model, UNH students participate in a deliberate, intentionally designed curriculum scaffolded across multiple and diverse levels of care within the community mental health care system to foster practice ready graduates. While the pilot project will begin with CHHS Department of Nursing Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and pre-licensure nursing programs, the aim of this partnership is to incorporate any degree bearing educational program, involving any associated college within UNH. Long-term growth will include other academic instructions and CMHCs. This academic practice partnership has bidirectional benefits of increasing the quality and quantity of educational training opportunities and growing the workforce pipeline while informing clinical practice improvements. Framework for Academic Practice Partnership will be reviewed, as will the policy, regulatory, licensing, and financial challenges outlined, with recommendations and rationale for multi-stakeholder support.

 

Debra Fournier, Advanced Practice Provider Lead – Psychiatry Director of PMHNP Education for Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Health

Ashwini Saxena, Vice President, Chief Medical Officer, Mental Health Center of Greater Manchester

Mary Ainslie, Assistant Professor; Nurse Practitioner, University of New Hampshire; Mental Health Center of Greater Nashua

Slide deck here

 

F6 – Impact of Military Culture on Mental Health and Substance Abuse

Frost/Hawthorne

 

Military culture often remains elusive to many who do not have direct experience working with military, veterans, or their families. This presentation will offer participants an opportunity to explore the needs of the military population that can be misunderstood. Participants will learn about service branches, impacts of service on mental health and substance use and the differences between civilian and military cultures. This workshop addresses the behavioral health policy and service needs of this special population, including all ages within it.

 

Katherin Langone, Owner, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and Master Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Freedom to Thrive Therapy LLC

Slide deck here

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